THEME BY SARAHCATHS+
scloutier:

barely-two-inch ink sketch of River and Song horsing around.  River is apparently not very ticklish.  Song is extremely.Nobody got hurt, though.  Song is squishier than they look.River is ThatDamnCrow’s character.

scloutier:

barely-two-inch ink sketch of River and Song horsing around.  River is apparently not very ticklish.  Song is extremely.

Nobody got hurt, though.  Song is squishier than they look.

River is ThatDamnCrow’s character.

vexartblog:

I was very disappointed with that Tali photo in Mass Effect so I thought I should try to draw a more alien-looking Tali with these glowing quarian-eyes. Quarians seem to have human noses so yeah. I drew her a human nose and some… Extra nostrils? They seem to be very sensitive to almost everything, so I thought quarians might have some highly developed sensory organs that work rather delicately,

vexartblog:

I was very disappointed with that Tali photo in Mass Effect so I thought I should try to draw a more alien-looking Tali with these glowing quarian-eyes. Quarians seem to have human noses so yeah. I drew her a human nose and some… Extra nostrils? They seem to be very sensitive to almost everything, so I thought quarians might have some highly developed sensory organs that work rather delicately,

syblatortue:

Follow up of this pic~
Nepeta thought that the wet kitty was just too pitiful not to smooch.

syblatortue:

Follow up of this pic~

Nepeta thought that the wet kitty was just too pitiful not to smooch.

itistimetodisappear:

the unholy offspring of lightning and de..AWWWWWWWWWW

ralphewig:

Heads Up - riding a bike just merged with being a fighter pilot. Meet the World’s Smartest Motorcycle Helmet (according to the people making it). With integrated smartphone tech, voice commands, rear view cameras, a headsup display, GPS navigation, and electronically adjustable visor tint, I’d have to agree. The only question to comes to mind is why aren’t F1 racers using this thing?

Dubbed the world’s smartest motorcycle helmet, the Skully AR-1 is a mean-looking Android-powered lid that has a number of tricks including a rear-facing camera that projects onto the visor what’s going on behind. This means riders will be able to pre-empt any upcoming hazards or change lanes without having to glance away from the road; a split second look that could otherwise be costly.

Apart from this wide-angle camera, GPS navigation is also projected onto the visor as well as speed and music and mobile phone functions, which can be controlled by voice command. Adding to its cool credentials is the electrochromic e-tint feature, which lets riders combat glaring sunlight by electronically making the visor darker at the press of a button.

If you’re raring to get the AR-1 to protect your melon, you’ve got a wait. It’s being put through the crowd-funding circuit on Indiegogo with a plan to ship in May 2015. It’s raised $836,000 of its $250,000 goal and there are a number of pre-orders available if you’re happy to put your money down. So, the price? It’ll cost a cool $1500 to get this tech on your head.

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for yourrainbowisshowing ! i imagine that some dragons wear makeup to make themselves more intimidating - dark red lipstick looks a lot like blood you know

iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for yourrainbowisshowing ! i imagine that some dragons wear makeup to make themselves more intimidating - dark red lipstick looks a lot like blood you know

fornaxed asked,
hi hello i am having an emergency and its name is "baby krogans" god bless u

lintufriikki:

that has to be the best type of emergency

image

easytourchina:

Xiushui Pagoda built in the 16th century in Shanghe Village of Huangbai Township, Dexing, east China’s Jiangxi Province has only half of its body remaining.

easytourchina:

Xiushui Pagoda built in the 16th century in Shanghe Village of Huangbai Township, Dexing, east China’s Jiangxi Province has only half of its body remaining.

realmfighter:

kanbarus:

poor kitten has a cold and can’t stop sneezing

rock the fuck out little cat

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history


In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.
They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.
But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.
This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.
The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.
“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.
It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.
In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.
“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”
He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.
“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.
“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”



Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history

In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.

They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.

But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.

This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.

The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.

“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.

It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.

In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.

“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”

He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.

“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.

“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”

lintufriikki:

i shouldn’t be allowed to do these because i end up putting too much time on them o<-<

meowvgonspengler:

yeah i know all of the zodiacs.

aries the ram, tavros the bull, gemini the twins, cancer the crab, leo the leijon, kanaya the vampire, libra the dragon, scorpio the spider, sagittarius the horse, capricorn the clown-goat, aquarius the seahorse, and pisces the terrifying tentacle monster.

pukind:

pupukadoodle:

Holy crap, Tuna, calm down. S’ok bro.
someone reblogged my lispy Sollux with “And then there’s Mituna..” and I couldn’t resist doing  a matching pic.

every time I forget about this one, I run into it again and still really like it. tunatunatuna

pukind:

pupukadoodle:

Holy crap, Tuna, calm down. S’ok bro.

someone reblogged my lispy Sollux with “And then there’s Mituna..” and I couldn’t resist doing  a matching pic.

every time I forget about this one, I run into it again and still really like it.

tunatunatuna